Entertainment

Preview for Nease Drama’s Fall Production

By: Mackenzie Daly (Entertainment Editor) and Marco Ugalde (Web Editor)
This fall, the theatre program is performing a play called “You Can’t Take It With You”. Mr. Segal and his wonderful cast has worked very hard to make this amazing play come to life on the Nease stage. This cast consists of twenty-two incredible actors and many more fantastic crew members. This play is about a dysfunctional family consisting of grandpa Vanderhof and his family, the Sycamores, who have very…

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Bring Back The Clown

By: Mia Sarmiento (Layout Editor) The highly anticipated “It: Chapter Two” has finally been released, and unlike its predecessor, it (no pun intended) has received mixed reviews. The fan favorite “It” (2017) takes place in the small town of Derry, Maine during the summer of 1989. Local children have been reported missing, and a group of outsiders known as the Losers Club are the only ones with potential to discover the truth behind the disappearances. Club members unite to defeat the elusive monster, Pennywise, who takes the form of their deepest fears and preys on the children of their small town. Two years after the highly acclaimed “It”, director Andy Muschietti presents audiences with another chilling encounter with Pennywise in “It: Chapter Two”. Following the Losers Club’s twenty-seven years after their first confrontation, the band of bullied kids come back to their hometown as adults to defeat the dreaded clown once and for all. As the characters face the conclusive battle behind their childhood monster, they find themselves facing old fears, unraveling suppressed feelings, and rectifying past relationships. The Writer’s Take: The movie is good, as far as sequels are concerned. It follows the original themes and story elements closely, and has a talented cast that greatly emphasizes the break between the Losers Club’s first encounter between Pennywise and the twenty-seven years that passed since the first movie took place. A fan of the movie, Kelly Stevenson, shares similar opinions stating “The movie was very good. The characters were good, the CGI was good. It was a scary movie, but I’m not a jumpy person. I also cried at the end, like a baby.” However, the length of the movie was both extreme and overkill: 2 hours and 49 minutes. The story included many side stories that could easily have been cut,and ultimately contributed to the overwhelming length of the movie. Jewel Pascuzzi remarked the following, “I thought it wasn’t that scary and more funny. It was an anticlimactic.” “It: Chapter Two” is not as good as its predecessor in terms of keeping the audience enthralled throughout the whole movie. However, the talented cast keeps the characters just as emotionally and comically entertaining as the original. Overall,  “It: Chapter Two” is definitely worth a watch if you’re looking for a scare or a laugh. Caption: The clown in question, Pennywise, emerging from behind his infamous red balloon. Credit: altpress.com

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NHS Tutoring

If you need help in any of your classes, Nease’s National Honor Society is doing tutoring in the media center. You can get help in a class during any lunch (with a lunch pass) or on Tuesday’s and Thursdays after school from 4:00 to 5:00.

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And… ACTION!

By Maria Ribot (Managing Layout Editor) The Vertical and WIRED are collaborating to make the switch of the century. Both crews will swap to see what it’s like to fulfill each other’s roles and responsibilities. In these next couple of weeks, the WIRED crew will be in the journalism room, learning how to pitch, plan, write, layout, and publish news stories. Currently, the WIRED crew is beginning to write their pitched and approved stories, which will appear on the March 2019 issue of The Vertical, which came out in March. The Nease Wired news broadcast show and The Vertical, the school newspaper, collaborated to switch places and experience what it’s like to be in each other’s place and appreciate the contributions that video and print journalism have in communications. Much of February for WIRED member consisted of producing stories, editing, and laying out in the computers while The Vertical staff members worked with WIRED to produce their very own package.   Both WIRED and The Vertical were eager to make this switch for the purpose of experiencing a type of journalism that they are not used to. As the thought process and conceptualization of both stories and packages progressed, both teams realized how rigorous is the work to produce and publish either forms of journalism. This switch helped bring awareness to mainly print journalism, as it is becoming less popular among high school students. Stay tuned for the epic and iconic WIRED and Vertical switch! Follow us on Instagram at @nhsvertical and WIRED on @neasewirednews   Update 1/29/19 The WIRED teams have started typing their stories into an official, shared document to start the editing and revision process. As the WIRED team drafts their stories, they progress through the interview and transcription process at the same time. After their first draft is done, they will endure the editing process, which will last until our Co-Publishers send off the newspaper files to go to print. Stay tuned for the epic and iconic WIRED and Vertical switch! Follow us on Instagram at @nhsvertical and WIRED on @neasewirednews   Update 2/8/19 The WIRED teams have finished their second draft of their stories and have started receiving edits from The Vertical staff members and revising grammar and spelling throughout their stories. Once the editing process concludes, the WIRED team will face the computers and interact with our dear friend, InDesign to layout their story on an actual newspaper page. Stay tuned for the epic and iconic WIRED and Vertical switch! Follow us on Instagram at @nhsvertical and WIRED on @neasewirednews   Update 2/15/19 The Nease Wired news broadcast show and The Vertical, the school newspaper, collaborated to switch places and experience what it’s like to be in each other’s place and appreciate the contributions that video and print journalism have in communications. Much of February for WIRED member consisted of producing stories, editing, and laying out in the computers while The Vertical staff members worked with WIRED to produce their very own package. Stay tuned for the epic and iconic WIRED and Vertical switch! Follow us on Instagram at @nhsvertical and WIRED on @neasewirednews     Update 3/1/19 Both WIRED and The Vertical were eager to make this switch for the purpose of experiencing a type of journalism that they are not used to. As the thought process and conceptualization of both stories and packages progressed, both teams realized how rigorous is the work to produce and publish either forms of journalism. This switch helped bring awareness to mainly print journalism, as it is becoming less popular among high school students. Stay tuned for the epic and iconic WIRED and Vertical switch! Follow us on Instagram at @nhsvertical and WIRED on @neasewirednews   Update 3/8 Newspaper staff members’ packages aired today! We couldn’t be more proud of our accomplishment that we’ve achieved. Video journalism requires a completely different area of expertise and it was definitely hard to cope with everyday challenges. Stay tuned for the epic and iconic WIRED and Vertical switch! Follow us on Instagram at @nhsvertical and WIRED on @neasewirednews     Thank you WIRED and Mr. Cooler for this amazing opportunity and we are looking forward to working with you in the future!

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Senior Expectations vs. Reality

By Bre Jarvis (Editor-in-Chief) Senior year is the greatest year of your life: unless you’re a senior, of course. Sorry to crush your dreams, but being a senior just isn’t everything you’ve dreamed up in that innocent little mind of yours. So, to help prepare you for reality, I’ve prepared a list of some of the expectations you might have about senior year vs. the reality of actually being a senior. Expectation: underclassmen in the halls will part before you like the Red Sea Reality: you’re still trudging along at 1 mph with everybody else, the cheese-grater walls slowly scraping your flesh off Expectation: you’ll feel confident now that you’re one of the “big kids” Reality: you’re low-key terrified of every freshman wearing fake nails and Nike shorts Expectation: now that you’re a senior, you can do whatever you want Reality: the only “freedom” you really have is leaving 3 minutes before everyone else Expectation: your schedule will give you a chance to recover from junior year Reality: against your better judgement you signed up for every AP or honors course that you figured colleges would like the look of, and you can now taste your imminent and inevitable death Well, there you go: senior year in a nutshell. It’s a little disappointing, I know, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be great anyway! Even if senior year isn’t the fantasy you’ve dreamt up in your head, it still has its perks. Maybe it’s not perfect, but wouldn’t it be boring if it were? After all, it’s those small, slightly cringey moments that really end up being the most memorable. Photo Credits: Tenor, Gifer, Giphy, MegaStarFM

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